5 Reasons Front-End Developers’ Lives Are Shorter

Photo Credit: Chris Fleming

The greater the applied stress range, see the shorter the life. –somewhere on wikipedia

Maybe it isn’t a proven scientific fact, but it is common knowledge that front-end developers deals with way more stress than back-end devs do.  These people, working with CSS, HTML, JavaScript and all that is contained in a web page are becoming increasingly jealous of their back-end counterparts’ quality of life.  Here are the top 5 reasons why:

Compile time (or lack of)

This an outstanding source of stress.  When you burst out a big chunk of code, you guys hit F5 and see the result, right?  Not working? Get back to work.  Now.

Back-end developers can always rely on compile time (or more contemporarily, build time) to relax a bit.  They can soothingly peek at their EVE online character skill training queue, answer a couple of tweets, or practice their vi kung fu.

Source code management

In my experience, front-end devs aren’t at ease with SCM (subversion, Git, etc).  That means when there’s a fire, a hard drive failure or a giant dinosaur spits fire on your laptop, you lose everything.  Sure, there’s a copy on the server, but that’s not how you do things (and what if the dinosaur also ate the server?).  Lots of time lost here, lots of stress.

Web standards

Web standards are a good thing.  But web standards, as they are advertised right now, are a real joke: you still rely on browser maker’s willingness on implementing them.  You still have a lot of tweaks, hacks, and duplicated code to craft.

Standards for back-end programming (JEE, SOAP, SQL, to name a few) are well defined, and mandatory.  The developer can lean on them and blame the product company which failed to implement them correctly (and get congratulated for it because you earned your company free support time).

Have you ever tried calling Microsoft, and open a support ticket for that unsupported CSS thing in IE?

The look

Even the worst snippet of C++ code, if it works, isn’t judged by anyone.  Why?  Nobody understands it. Nobody gets to see the actual code, it’s all 1s and 0s.

On the other hand, you front-end guys have to deal with the judging eyes of everyone in the company.  You have to take all the “Meh. I still don’t like that turquoise” … even if it ‘s the best darn piece of code you ever wrote!  You literarily get stripped of all your intrinsic self-worth.

View source

What if you were in a crowd (a big one, think Tahrir square), and someone removed all your clothes.  Nobody would like that, unless you’re sexually deviant.  That’s what happens when some guy does a right-click -> view source on your code.  Guilt, doubt, fear.

Conclusion

I fear for you guys.  Really.  I could suggest a couple of COBOL books, or Java certification classes, but if you already have a couple of years of experience behind you, I guess it’s a little bit too late.  What might help is if you try yoga, tai-chi, or as a last resort you could try the essential works of Yanni.

Cheers,

JS.
Back-end developer.

Want to Work With Me? Here’s How

Photo Credit: flattop341

The dos & don’ts of pitching yourself to a web designer

One of the phenomenona that comes with running your own web design firm is frequent inquiries from both wannabe and experienced web designers and programmers.

I love to help out folks getting started in the industry – I always appreciated it myself when I transitioned from working in film and TV production to the web sphere – but it always startles me how many people are completely clueless about the best way to approach me when they’re looking for work. I’m not alone; colleagues complain about the same pitching missteps.

Here are some practical dos & don’ts:

Don’t send me email attachments – especially when my contact page specifically begs you not to. I don’t need a 5-page PDF of your curriculum vitae, buy more about listing a chronology of your work & education; I want to see what you can do.

Do send a link to your online portfolio in the body of your message. If you’re pitching yourself as a web designer, nurse I want to see a minimum of 5 sites you’ve worked on – ideally more – with a clear description of your role in each project. They don’t all have to be live, archived on your portfolio site is fine. (You do have your own domain and online portfolio site, right?)

Don’t call me out of the blue and not ask if I have a moment before launching into a soliloquy so fast and loud that I have to hold the phone away from my ear so I don’t damage my hearing. (Yes, this has actually happened.) The work that web designers and developers do requires focus and concentration. If you’d like to have a phone chat, tell me why in a quick email, and we can schedule a call in advance to make sure I can give you all my attention.

Do have a few people carefully proofread your cover letter before sending it. If you can’t be bothered to spell correctly and use proper punctuation, I assume you’ll be as sloppy with your coding. This is an excerpt from an actual letter I received recently:

After a stint as a pratice lawyer in insurance litigation, I decided to move on and redirect my career in a more creative, dynamic and technological fiel of study.

I’m creative, inventive. I’m also a perfectionnist, with a great sens of job well done. I am very approachable and I have a great listening sense.

I excel in writing, in both English and French.

Don’t write a generic-sounding letter. Address me by name – it’s clearly on my website, take the extra three seconds to find it. Refer to something specific about my company that explains why you want to work with me. Doing these two things alone will make you stand out among the 100 others who’ve sent me job inquiries.

Do tell me what you’re passionate about. Are you a WordPress fanatic? Enthused about e-commerce? Driven by design? Let that excitement shine through your words.

Don’t write a novel. Be brief and get to the point: what specific role are you looking for and what makes you suitable? Do I even need your services? Check out my work first – pitching me your ASP.NET database programming skills wastes both of our time.

Do get to know me first, before even sending that first intro email. Twitter is a fantastic way to get a sense of whether we’re on the same wavelength, which is essential for harmonious collaborations. Start a conversation and see if we click. If you get fed up with my tweets about cats & food and decide you’d rather work with a World of Warcraft enthusiast, I promise I won’t be offended.

Becoming an Author in the iPad Era

Photo Credit: Jeremy Keith

If you’re like most folks, buy information pills at one time or another, decease you’ve thought about taking that one great idea, hunkering down in front of the typewriter or word processor and just letting the words flow till they all come together to form The Great Novel. Many have actually done so, launching themselves head first, typing out the first few sentences of their masterpiece. But if you’re like most, you probably gave up after less than a page, never mind finishing one chapter. And from there, the numbers thin out to just the very few who somehow plug away till their book is done.

If you managed to finish the first draft of your very first novel, congratulations. It’s not easy. But you like it. You think it’s good. Real good. Now you want to share it with the world.

The world of book publishing has changed. A lot. For a budding new writer, now may be the best time ever to stand shoulder to shoulder with the big players.

Consumption versus Creation
Technology has accelerated people’s ability to consume endless amounts of information and media. There is an abundance of choice today previously unknown in human history. The industrial revolution created an almost limitless supply of physical goods that consumers could buy and enhance their lives. Now with the information revolution, media content has exponentially grown to the point where no one person could ever conceivably watch, listen, read or experience everything they find enticing.

Oh. But there is a downside.

With all this consumption, individuals could miss out on the other opportunities afforded by today’s technology: content creation.

Okay. So maybe you can’t sing or play an instrument. And for most, making a movie or a television show is out of the question.

But we all have one skill that we can leverage into content: language. As long as you can string a sentence together, you can write a book. All it takes is a good idea, a computer with writing software and patience to see it through. And a good book can propel a person from obscurity to fame and fortune.

Well, okay. Rarely. But you just know it’ll be you this time, right? Right on.

Electronic Distribution
The publishing industry is a big machine with a chain made up of authors (the folks who write the books), agents (the folks who match up authors with publishing houses), publishers (the folks who print, package, market and ship the books), retailers (the folks who sell the books) and consumers (the folks who buy and read the books). Like baseball, music labels and movie studios, publishers found that they could make oodles of cash by taking raw talent and turning it into gold. And by getting as much strict control on as many links in the chain as they can, they can make sure they maximize their profits. In the good ol’ days, you needed their big machine to do all things required to print and distribute a book. They liked it this way. It’s understandable.

Now it’s different.

There’s the internet. There are e-books. There are e-readers. There’s EPUB. There are short-run book manufacturers like Blurb and Lulu who can make one book at a time that looks as professional as anything at your local bookstore. There are turnkey solutions like iUniverse. There’s the Kindle. And then there’s the iPad and iBooks. And even more to come.

You don’t have to go through the machine anymore.

Media Lessons Learned
The music industry failed to embrace digital technology from the outset and they’re paying the price. By its nature, music is a low commitment medium. It takes about four minutes to consume one distinct unit. CD players and radios are cheap. It can just hover there in the background while you mow the lawn or drive your car. The file sizes are small (thanks, MP3), so pirating piles of songs is like using up a wad of napkins at Mickey D’s that you don’t really need, but like to have around, just in case. Plus the quality can be middling for most people’s tastes. Not a good medium to stake your financial future on.

Then there’s movies and television. Bigger commitment. You need to be sitting still for between 30 and 180 minutes to consume one distinct unit. Television sets, video players and trips to the theater cost more. The file sizes are much bigger, so that stems piracy. Somewhat. They’re looking at the music industry and thinking, ‘maybe we should be a little more open to digital technology’. It’s helping. A little. But their industry isn’t been on the verge of tanking like music has. Yet.

Now, publishing. Books? Huge commitment. You really need to have your nose in front of that page. Hours, days, even weeks to consume one unit. Photocopy a book? Who has the time? If there’s no PDF floating around, who would bother ripping it off? People have a much more visceral relationship with books. Almost a sensual one. And the publishing industry, thanks to Apple and Amazon, have decided to embrace digital technology.

There’s an opportunity there.

The Writing Process
So. You want to be a fiction writer? Fire up the ol’ Word or OpenOffice and just start typing away, right? Well, that’s probably not the best way to go about it.

Introduce yourself to the concept of non-linear writing.

Word processors by the nature of their architecture presume you will begin your document in the upper lefthand corner, work your way to the right, make a carriage return and drop a line and so on till your manuscript is done.

There’s a better way.

What if you want to start a third of the way in? Then maybe write a scene near the end. Or maybe you have an idea for a prologue before the first chapter.

In the olden days, there were these small pieces of cardboard called index cards. You could write a story idea on one and just lay it out on a corkboard or table. Then you could just play with these discrete ideas and reorder them till you fleshed out your narrative.

For Mac users, there’s Scrivener. For Windows folks, PageFour and others. They will free you from the bonds of linear thinking and make your writing project that much more pleasant. If not for Scrivener, I would have never been able to finish the first draft of my first real novel.

For years, I took stab after stab at writing a book. Never could do it. I always ran out of steam very early on. A non-linear text editor like Scrivener really changed everything for me. Like the first time I put together an Ikea bookcase with a cordless drill instead of breaking my wrist with a screwdriver, doing a major project was something to look forward to, not dread like some awful chore.

Good tools make a difference.

In the process of writing my book, there were some valuable lessons I learned that every newbie writer ought to know. There are many others, but these are all pretty basic.

Show. Don’t tell. In other words, describe the scene using the senses. Don’t just report what’s happened.

Remember the rule of three acts: establish your lead character, make him or her in face ever-mounting conflicts, end off with a huge climax.

Read good authors. Learn from them.

Raise the stakes. Constantly. Keep the action juiced up with a few breathers here and there for some balance.

Finish every scene with a sentence that has an emotional touchstone or a springboard to propel the reader onward.

You can’t completely avoid using adjectives and adverbs, but use descriptive, illustrative images instead when you can.

Keep the final manuscript to between 80,000 and 120,000 words. 100,000 is the sweet spot to aim for.

Hire an editor. If you can’t, be brutal with yourself, even if it is your baby and lop off excess limbs to make it better.

Use a dictionary, thesaurus and spell checker. Watch the grammar.

Keep the drama high and the peril ominous. But don’t be preachy or melodramatic.

Avoid clichés.

Trim the dialog. Keep it punchy, quick and understated.

Expect criticism.

The first draft will be garbage. Period. Don’t worry and don’t self-edit till it’s finished. Once the first draft’s out the door, you can brutalize it all you want. Whatever you do, don’t stop in the middle and nitpick.

Wikipedia is your buddy. Hang out.

Don’t frontload your story. Let it stretch out naturally. Don’t give it all away in the first chapter. Feed the reader by the morsel.

Enjoy every minute.

The Urge to Write
They say do it for love. Not for money. That’s good advice for anything worth spending your time on. For writing, the motive should be for the pure pleasure of telling a story.

As a web designer, there is a great satisfaction in the process of starting with nothing and then creating something beautiful and functional that all the world can experience. That’s the great thing about the web. Anyone anywhere can see what we’ve made.

Creativity is what satisfies the ongoing personal struggle we all deal with when trying to decipher the hidden meaning of our existence. It is in making something beautiful out of our pure imagination that gives us as designers, programmers and authors a real sense of purpose that is tangible. In a sense, we all are storytellers in our own right.

The art of writing fiction gives everyone an opportunity to explore the sheerest heights and depths of human emotion and experience, pitting characters who represent us in the most extreme situations, putting to the test our values, aspirations and our weaknesses and sharing them with others in insightful and entertaining ways. Everyone should, at least once in their lives, write a long form story, if only for the experience.

And there’s no better time than right now.

Rock Star

Photo Credit: Jeremy Keith

If you’re like most folks, buy information pills at one time or another, decease you’ve thought about taking that one great idea, hunkering down in front of the typewriter or word processor and just letting the words flow till they all come together to form The Great Novel. Many have actually done so, launching themselves head first, typing out the first few sentences of their masterpiece. But if you’re like most, you probably gave up after less than a page, never mind finishing one chapter. And from there, the numbers thin out to just the very few who somehow plug away till their book is done.

If you managed to finish the first draft of your very first novel, congratulations. It’s not easy. But you like it. You think it’s good. Real good. Now you want to share it with the world.

The world of book publishing has changed. A lot. For a budding new writer, now may be the best time ever to stand shoulder to shoulder with the big players.

Consumption versus Creation
Technology has accelerated people’s ability to consume endless amounts of information and media. There is an abundance of choice today previously unknown in human history. The industrial revolution created an almost limitless supply of physical goods that consumers could buy and enhance their lives. Now with the information revolution, media content has exponentially grown to the point where no one person could ever conceivably watch, listen, read or experience everything they find enticing.

Oh. But there is a downside.

With all this consumption, individuals could miss out on the other opportunities afforded by today’s technology: content creation.

Okay. So maybe you can’t sing or play an instrument. And for most, making a movie or a television show is out of the question.

But we all have one skill that we can leverage into content: language. As long as you can string a sentence together, you can write a book. All it takes is a good idea, a computer with writing software and patience to see it through. And a good book can propel a person from obscurity to fame and fortune.

Well, okay. Rarely. But you just know it’ll be you this time, right? Right on.

Electronic Distribution
The publishing industry is a big machine with a chain made up of authors (the folks who write the books), agents (the folks who match up authors with publishing houses), publishers (the folks who print, package, market and ship the books), retailers (the folks who sell the books) and consumers (the folks who buy and read the books). Like baseball, music labels and movie studios, publishers found that they could make oodles of cash by taking raw talent and turning it into gold. And by getting as much strict control on as many links in the chain as they can, they can make sure they maximize their profits. In the good ol’ days, you needed their big machine to do all things required to print and distribute a book. They liked it this way. It’s understandable.

Now it’s different.

There’s the internet. There are e-books. There are e-readers. There’s EPUB. There are short-run book manufacturers like Blurb and Lulu who can make one book at a time that looks as professional as anything at your local bookstore. There are turnkey solutions like iUniverse. There’s the Kindle. And then there’s the iPad and iBooks. And even more to come.

You don’t have to go through the machine anymore.

Media Lessons Learned
The music industry failed to embrace digital technology from the outset and they’re paying the price. By its nature, music is a low commitment medium. It takes about four minutes to consume one distinct unit. CD players and radios are cheap. It can just hover there in the background while you mow the lawn or drive your car. The file sizes are small (thanks, MP3), so pirating piles of songs is like using up a wad of napkins at Mickey D’s that you don’t really need, but like to have around, just in case. Plus the quality can be middling for most people’s tastes. Not a good medium to stake your financial future on.

Then there’s movies and television. Bigger commitment. You need to be sitting still for between 30 and 180 minutes to consume one distinct unit. Television sets, video players and trips to the theater cost more. The file sizes are much bigger, so that stems piracy. Somewhat. They’re looking at the music industry and thinking, ‘maybe we should be a little more open to digital technology’. It’s helping. A little. But their industry isn’t been on the verge of tanking like music has. Yet.

Now, publishing. Books? Huge commitment. You really need to have your nose in front of that page. Hours, days, even weeks to consume one unit. Photocopy a book? Who has the time? If there’s no PDF floating around, who would bother ripping it off? People have a much more visceral relationship with books. Almost a sensual one. And the publishing industry, thanks to Apple and Amazon, have decided to embrace digital technology.

There’s an opportunity there.

The Writing Process
So. You want to be a fiction writer? Fire up the ol’ Word or OpenOffice and just start typing away, right? Well, that’s probably not the best way to go about it.

Introduce yourself to the concept of non-linear writing.

Word processors by the nature of their architecture presume you will begin your document in the upper lefthand corner, work your way to the right, make a carriage return and drop a line and so on till your manuscript is done.

There’s a better way.

What if you want to start a third of the way in? Then maybe write a scene near the end. Or maybe you have an idea for a prologue before the first chapter.

In the olden days, there were these small pieces of cardboard called index cards. You could write a story idea on one and just lay it out on a corkboard or table. Then you could just play with these discrete ideas and reorder them till you fleshed out your narrative.

For Mac users, there’s Scrivener. For Windows folks, PageFour and others. They will free you from the bonds of linear thinking and make your writing project that much more pleasant. If not for Scrivener, I would have never been able to finish the first draft of my first real novel.

For years, I took stab after stab at writing a book. Never could do it. I always ran out of steam very early on. A non-linear text editor like Scrivener really changed everything for me. Like the first time I put together an Ikea bookcase with a cordless drill instead of breaking my wrist with a screwdriver, doing a major project was something to look forward to, not dread like some awful chore.

Good tools make a difference.

In the process of writing my book, there were some valuable lessons I learned that every newbie writer ought to know. There are many others, but these are all pretty basic.

Show. Don’t tell. In other words, describe the scene using the senses. Don’t just report what’s happened.

Remember the rule of three acts: establish your lead character, make him or her in face ever-mounting conflicts, end off with a huge climax.

Read good authors. Learn from them.

Raise the stakes. Constantly. Keep the action juiced up with a few breathers here and there for some balance.

Finish every scene with a sentence that has an emotional touchstone or a springboard to propel the reader onward.

You can’t completely avoid using adjectives and adverbs, but use descriptive, illustrative images instead when you can.

Keep the final manuscript to between 80,000 and 120,000 words. 100,000 is the sweet spot to aim for.

Hire an editor. If you can’t, be brutal with yourself, even if it is your baby and lop off excess limbs to make it better.

Use a dictionary, thesaurus and spell checker. Watch the grammar.

Keep the drama high and the peril ominous. But don’t be preachy or melodramatic.

Avoid clichés.

Trim the dialog. Keep it punchy, quick and understated.

Expect criticism.

The first draft will be garbage. Period. Don’t worry and don’t self-edit till it’s finished. Once the first draft’s out the door, you can brutalize it all you want. Whatever you do, don’t stop in the middle and nitpick.

Wikipedia is your buddy. Hang out.

Don’t frontload your story. Let it stretch out naturally. Don’t give it all away in the first chapter. Feed the reader by the morsel.

Enjoy every minute.

The Urge to Write
They say do it for love. Not for money. That’s good advice for anything worth spending your time on. For writing, the motive should be for the pure pleasure of telling a story.

As a web designer, there is a great satisfaction in the process of starting with nothing and then creating something beautiful and functional that all the world can experience. That’s the great thing about the web. Anyone anywhere can see what we’ve made.

Creativity is what satisfies the ongoing personal struggle we all deal with when trying to decipher the hidden meaning of our existence. It is in making something beautiful out of our pure imagination that gives us as designers, programmers and authors a real sense of purpose that is tangible. In a sense, we all are storytellers in our own right.

The art of writing fiction gives everyone an opportunity to explore the sheerest heights and depths of human emotion and experience, pitting characters who represent us in the most extreme situations, putting to the test our values, aspirations and our weaknesses and sharing them with others in insightful and entertaining ways. Everyone should, at least once in their lives, write a long form story, if only for the experience.

And there’s no better time than right now.

Photo Credit: Tim Samoff

Justin (a fictional person for this article) considers himself to be a very good designer. He trained at a local college, discount got decent grades, and even landed a respectable job at an agency in his area. But Justin feels that he can do more with his skills as a freelancer, or perhaps move on to a more well-known studio for work. Unfortunately, he can’t seem to get the attention from those who will ultimately help him achieve his long-term goals.

Part of the problem is how easily Justin becomes frustrated when he sees work that is superior to his own. He begins hitting creativity walls and starts asking the wrong questions, like “Why can’t I be that good?”, or “Why don’t people see me for my worth?”,  or even “Do I suck at this?”.

You might be Justin, or you might know someone who is. I’ve had days where I feel just like this, and so have you. We all know these feelings, because deep down inside, we all kind of like the idea of being mini-rockstars in our own circle of what we do, yet we also have days where we feel that we don’t deserve it when seeing what our peers are up to.

The obvious response would be to tell the Justins of the world to just keep at it. “Work hard and never give up!”, “Be strong!”, and “Hang in there!”. I know I’ve heard that more than a few times in my life. And even though it’s the pure truth of what needs done, there’s so much more to it than that.

An Analogy

Let’s say that there’s a chef who is looking to really make a culinary impact on his city. To make something that people would want to come to his restaurant for. He makes a killer dish, but his food turns out tasting much like that prepared by 40 other chefs in his area. So, he has an idea: to alter his recipe into something that few other chefs are doing. He creates his own blend of flavors.

At this point, something very interesting happens – his audience begins to divide into two primary groups: Those who criticize his cooking skills, and those who rave about it. All eyes (and taste-buds) turn to our chef to see what he’s been up to. Even people reading the critics turn up, generally out of curiosity – because most people are a little nosy. The raving reviews even earn him a couple of mentions in the local newspaper, which he appreciates.

Now, our chef is becoming locally famous, is bringing attention to his area (and his restaurant), and is beginning to make some of his dreams really come true, all because he stopped trying to make everyone happy, and started specializing in something truly unique. By altering his recipe just a tiny bit, he was able to move forward in his career.

Back to Justin

The one thing that keeps Justin from “good” versus “great” at this point is being afraid of creating something that some people will not like, by trying to make something that everybody will like. It’s nearly impossible to pull this off, but yet there he is, over and over again, creating designs that look like everyone else’s because trying something different is too high risk.

Justin probably has one thing in his skill set that he’s good at, more than anyone else, because it’s something he loves personally. By learning to focus his attention on this, channelling his design energy into that skill, he will, in point of fact, be creating his own chef’s recipe.

If we all learn one thing from Justin, it’s that we can’t be afraid of creating something that may potentially not be liked by everyone. When we design with our hearts, with passion, people recognize that, and follow you on your own path to greatness. We don’t need to be better than everyone else, we just need to be better than ourselves.

Managing Your Career in the World of Web Development, Part 2

Photo Credit: Josh Westbrook

Last month I talked about how web development has become commoditzed and specialized to the point where large software shops are now as digital analogues to agricultural feedlots. Web shops are becoming vast cube farms of production where the quality of the work is sometimes secondary to the process in which it is produced. While this is less true in Canada than other countries, link make no mistake – this kind of thinking permeates today’s market where you are today.

This is a first.

In the world of cattle farming, neurologist or automotive manufacturing, healthful such a concept would long ago have been acknowledged, been dealt with and documentation consigned to the archives. Not so in web development. If you’re a web developer, or work in the world of the internet in any of its myriad incarnations, you inhabit a work environment that has no precedent. No legacy, or at least if there is one it is nascent and so by definition not significant.

And so it becomes necessary to learn how to make your way in a world where there is no previous generation to guide you. No manuals exist and no signposts grace your path. Let me offer up a few simple things to keep in mind.

It’s about your career

The first thing you have to realize is you have a career and sometimes it’s not your job. Hopefully more often than not it is, but what’s critical is that you see your career for the continuum that it is. It started when you got your first job and it ends whenever you decide, and every moment you spend on the continuum contributes to its direction and continuity. The direction of your career is yours to steer but do make an effort to have a direction in mind. It’s not necessary that your direction remain consistent (though of course there is nothing wrong if it does). What does matter is that you have one. As the aphorism goes, ‘when one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable.’

Where to begin

Many people starting out today take the obvious routes and either go to an agency like Sapphire or SI Systems or go corporate–IBM, Accenture, Microsoft, Google. These large organizations all fulfill the same need for their employees–they provide clearly defined structures and processes combined with personnel to support whatever the rules and regulations are. It can be very comforting for some to know that all you have to worry about is being on time, dressing appropriately and writing code. If you buy into the cog-in-a-wheel mindset, you’re reasonbly good at your task and reasonably reliable at delivery, you can count on a reasonably successful tenure at one of these companies.

People looking for something more exciting go freelance. The pay is better (though it comes with some extra work) and you can get a broad exposure to different workplaces and work practices while building up a large stable of contacts.

The real prize in the digital world these days is landing a gig at a big digital agency–AKQA, Sapient, BBDO–these are world-wide organizations that combine (mostly) the cool of the creative world with the benefits of a large scale enterprise work force.

Whichever path you find yourself on remember the first rule–it’s about your career, not your job. In our next installment we’ll talk about how to avoid some common mistakes. We’ll also cover some techniques for keeping an eye on your career while the other is on your job.

Social Networking: Insurance For Your Career

Photo Credit: Jeff Turner

If you’re a software engineer, what is ed especially if you’re in Silicon Valley, you will no-doubt have been pinged several times by recruiters and former coworkers about exciting opportunities at their company. How should you respond? You might be really happy at your current company and not even be thinking about leaving. Being a technical recruiter in the valley, I hear this all the time. People love their jobs and aren’t interested in discussing opportunities.

My advice to you is, always take the time to listen to the opportunity even though you might not be interested–at the time–in taking it. Listening to opportunities is like taking out insurance. You might not need it, but it’s critical to have when you do.

Think of the reasons why you love your job:

“My boss is the greatest and I flourish under him or her.” Your boss can leave at the drop of a hat and their replacement can be worse.

The company atmosphere is great. Your company could be sold or go through lay-offs. Or after a certain amount of time the environment of your company could no longer fit your lifestyle.

When these things start happening, people start scrambling to try and remember that person who reached out to them. The person they never even responded to. It’s good to keep a list going of all the recruiters or coworkers that have reached out to you. Thus when you do find yourself on the market, you won’t be starting from scratch. You’ll have a clear path of leads to reach out to at your own pace when you are ready.

What if you don’t like the company a recruiter is working for? The Valley is all about relationships, and recruiters are known to go from agencies to big named companies to start ups and back to big named companies again.  (I should know. I’ve done all three in my career.) Recruiters keep lists of top candidates, another reason it’s good to connect with them. Because down the road, they might go to a company that you would be very excited to work for. Or they might know someone that can help you out.

It’s also good to remember that companies can change when considering opportunities. Nine years ago, a certain big-named Bay Area company’s stock was going at $22 per share. People thought they were done. The stock is now at $250 per share! When that company was recruiting they recruited their future vision. Now some of those people who took the leap are benefiting from it.

So how do you get your “social networking insurance” ready? You should keep your social profiles current, and not wait until you’re in need (just like insurance). This way it’s ready when you need it. Get LinkedIn recommendations during your tenure at your company and not when you are ready to leave. Also, take part in groups and other interests that encourage networking. People like to hire people they’ve known via blogs, meet-ups, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, etc… People (not just recruiters) will always reach out to their networks first. A lot of the time when a manager hires a referral, it isn’t someone’s aunt Margaret, or their neighbor, but someone they’ve connected with via social media. This can also come in handy when it’s your turn to hire people for yourself.

So remember it’s like insurance you might not need, but when you do, it is there for you!